Love and Faith reconnect Russian adoptee with birth family after 16 years

Truth is stranger than fiction, especially in the latest adoption case where I volunteered to help with finding the birth family. Five possible relatives were contacted on two Russian social networks to help give the adoptee information on her life and family in Russia.

No one, except for a woman named Lyubov (Russian for Love) would help the adoptee, I’ll name Sara, get answers about her birth family. My name Vera is Russian for Faith. So it really took Love and Faith to end the mystery of Sara’s adoption.

At a last resort, I contacted Lyubov on popular Russian social network VK.com. The relatives on OK.ru weren’t interested in helping Sara. Lyubov‘s pictures showed friendliness and kindness in her face. The truthfulness of her appearance was proven when she responded with so much excitement that Sara was looking for her birth family.

To make Sara’s reconnection with her birth family emotionally safe as possible, I had her create a profile on VK.com with her birth name, birth date, birthplace and a photo from her adoption. Her birth family doesn’t know the name she was given by her adoptive family, her e-mail address nor phone number.

Information has been exchanged a few times and the process of completely reconnecting will take time but I made sure this is the correct family. As in the last adoption case I voluntarily helped with, I withheld information to see whether Lyubov would give it up.

Sara knows she has a brother, whose name and birthdate are known. I wrote to Lyubov that Sara knows of a brother and that is it. Lyubov knew the brother’s name immediately. That was the confirmation that Sara needed that Lyubov really was family. She is her aunt but very close in age to Sara.

The final confirmation that proved Sara has found her birth family was the photo Aunt Lyubov share with Sara that shows Sara, her mother and brother. Sadly nothing is known about where are Sara’s parents and her brother.

The brother was adopted in Russia and likely has a new name but there is hope that Sara could reconnect with him. If he remembers her personal details, her profile is on VK.com, waiting to be found.

Sara was adopted about 16 years ago and it only took about a few minutes to find her relatives on social networks, thanks to my knowledge of Russian. Finding family in the former USSR is as simple as learning the Russian alphabet from Wikipedia, copy the new name in Russian and paste it into Google or Russian social networks.

Nothing beats the feeling of experiencing the excitement of long-lost family being just as enthusiastic for being found again and told that they were not forgotten.

Related posts:

On a journey to connect Russian adoptees with their homeland family

A bonus find for the adopted Russian brother and sister

 

When family “wild stories” are nothing but reality

The joke in Russian genealogy is figuring out which family stories are real. But the sad reality is that the craziest stories are really the truth.

Anyone who isn’t familiar with the past realities of life in the USSR will have a hard time believing the below scenarios were real.

Scenario 1: Uncle Vladimir was reading a foreign newspaper on a train. He was arrested for being an enemy of the state and beaten in prison for a confession that he was a spy.

Reality: Possession of anything foreign caused a great stir. Anyone who had foreign items was considered suspicious.

Scenario 2: Aunt Katya got in a fight with her cousin Svetlana. Katya sent a foreigner looking for a place to stay to Svetlana’s apartment. Katya and Svetlana never talked to each other again and Svetlana’s neighbors never trusted her again.

Reality: Talking to a foreigner was a big no-no during the Soviet era.

Scenario 3: Grand Uncle Vasil stole food from a store. He was arrested, sent to Siberia and tried to return to his family after he served his time. His wife Yulia never responded to his letters from prison. When he came home, none of his family nor friends would say they knew him.

Reality: When someone was sent to Siberia, people usually tried to forget about that person. Continuing contact with that person would cause trouble and unwanted attention when people tried to live a quiet life in the USSR.

Scenario 4: Aunt Anna was poor and her brother Simon took pity on her. While Simon was living in Germany, he sent Anna packages of clothing. She was arrested and questioned by police about whether she was a foreign spy.

Reality: Getting foreign mail raised a red flag. Contact with foreigners (by phone, mail or in person) was forbidden. In some rare situations, getting letters from foreigners was overlooked and didn’t bring trouble.

Scenario 5: Uncle Dimitri and his family immigrated to Germany during World War II. He never wrote or called his parents ever again. His father died a few years after World War II. He wanted to attend his funeral but Uncle Dimitri was afraid to be arrested and sent to Siberia.

Reality: Once you left the USSR, you never returned nor had contact with your family until the Iron Curtain fell.

Scenario 6: Uncle Alex was feeling quite relaxed at a party after a few drinks. He told a joke, making fun of the Soviet government. Alex was arrested and never heard from again.

Reality: Tell a bad joke and you’re a walking dead man.

Scenario 7: Grandma Ludmilla confesses at Christmas dinner that her name is really Yelena Smirnova. She and grandpa lost their identification during the war. They passed an overturned truck with a dead couple. They went in their pockets and took their identity cards. From then on, they took on dead couple’s identity.

Reality: Not every identity card had photos so it was easy to assume new identities. Civil records were lost in bombings. Confirming identities were hard for those using real and fake names.

My reality: 6 of these situations occurred in my family or to those my family knew. Truth is really stranger than fiction, a warning to remember before eliminating a relative who tells “wild stories” as a source.

A kick in the stomach when priorities are lost in genealogy

Today I was thinking about what I haven’t worked on lately. So out of curiosity I googled my grandfather’s address to see what his home looks like today. A few years have passed since I checked on his home.

I saw a towering brick building as wood planks leaned against his entrance. That brick building wasn’t his house. The only portion left of his home was the green wooden gate attached to crumbling brick supporting walls.

That picture was taken in 2013. My heart is going to be crushed when a friend e-mails me pictures of what the property looks like today. I have been meaning to write a letter to the owner to see whether he would send me pictures of the property and tell me whether anything interesting has been found over the years.

I got distracted with other things and never thought I had to worry about the home being demolished anytime soon. With my grandfather being born in 1885 in Russia and I being born in 1976 in the USA, I never had a chance to see the house due to time and finances.

So I am grateful that I had a local man in my grandfather’s southern Russian city take pictures and video of the property from the street 5 1/2 years ago. The guy could not convince the owner to open his gate to take pictures.

Now I appreciate having those photos and video from the street beyond words can say.

I found the friendly guy who took the pictures and video through someone who saw my post on the city’s Facebook page. That opened the door to connect with several people who have helped me with researching my grandparents’ lives.

This discovery of my grandfather’s house being wiped away has changed my priorities. My research needs more focus on the places where my family lived and those places that touched their lives before they are next to be wiped away.

It’s great and important to document the lives of our ancestors but to touch and experience the places of their lives is priceless.

pavelivanov68pavelhome2013

Playing the waiting game to connect a Russian adoptee with her birth family

It took about a minute to find the family of a Russian adoptee on popular Russian social network Odnoklassniki. The struggle has been waiting for someone from the family to answer my message.

The situation has been a lucky break so far. Thanks to the adoptee knowing the name of the village where she was born in the 1990s, finding the family on Odnoklassniki was as simple as searching the village name and birth surname in Russian on Google.

Four people carrying the same surname in the same village appeared on the first page of search results as Odnoklassniki members. I immediately wrote to them about the adoptee’s situation and provided two photos of her when she was adopted by a U.S. couple.

The biggest advantage of using Odnoklassniki is that it can become the mousetrap for finding family in the former USSR. I know the exact time when one relative viewed my message, when she visited my profile and when she views the website with a blinking dot even without being friends with her.

I sent that woman a second message stating that the adoptee had a brother and his birth date. Hopefully, that woman will realize I mean business in trying to connect the adoptee with her birth family.

The rest of the family on Odnoklassniki will know I am determined to have the adoptee’s dream come true. If the four people identified as relatives won’t respond to my message, I will contact other relatives listed as friends in their profiles.

Someone in the family will eventually give in and respond to my message. I found another relative on another Russian social network, VK, giving my chances of a response higher.

It has been frustrating that I have not been able to find the birth mother nor father online. The adoption was finalized when the child was 5 years old so relatives had that time to connect with the child.

This adoption would be hard to hide. A relative in the village will recall this adoptee and have pictures of her hidden away. The brother was also adopted. A major event caused these adoptions.

All these factors hopefully will increase the chances someone will answer my plea for information so the adoptee can finally get answers about her birth family.

And no, I am not taking money to help the adoptee. It was my dream to adopt a Russian child. Due to finances, that will never happen for me. I am almost as happy to help Russian adoptees find their birth families.

Related posts:
On a journey to connect Russian adoptees with their homeland family

A bonus find for the adopted Russian brother and sister

Families reveal stories of Soviet Army soldiers for the Great Patriotic War

b_polk_shapka_2The people of the former USSR will never forget the Great Patriotic War. A boundless amount of information has been finding its way onto the Internet. The only things lacking online have been faces and stories of the Red Army soldiers until now.

Бессмертного полка is filling in that gap to bring faces and stories of the average Soviet Army soldier. It’s easy to find this material on the soldiers who were most notable in the Great Patriotic War.

Now, the average and proud Soviet Army soldiers are being remembered with photos and stories by their living relatives on Бессмертного полка.  Maybe I should say LIVING RELATIVES one more time.

This is not just some website with a list of soldiers and their divisions. It’s an opportunity to find living relatives of family disconnected by the war.

So here’s how to use the website:

  1. First use Google Translate to put names and places of residence in Russian.
  2. Copy and paste the translated keywords into the search box here and click on искать. If results are not found, slowly reduce the number of keywords for the soldier being researched.
  3. When the results appear, copy and paste them into Google Translate to see which results would be most useful.
  4. If the website is intimidating in Russian, use this technique: translated name of solider and their place of residence into Google with site:http://moypolk.ru/. For example: Иванов Кострома  site:http://moypolk.ru/ Then follow step 3.
  5. To contact the person who posted a page, click on the name next to Координатор on the right that is above МЫ В СОЦСЕТЯХ (for the social network images). That person is the organizer for the region where that soldier lived.

Family also can be found by copying keywords from the soldier’s page such as full name, Родился (born) then date,  д. (abbreviation for village) then the village’s name, and медали (medals) and pasting those keywords into Google.

Make that extra effort and it could result in discovering an incredible amount of information on those long, lost relatives.

Related posts:
Massive Soviet Army WWII database tells the story of millions of soldiers
Time-killing Google search leads to massive WWI database

Unique website reveals military and repression era information from Russia

Finding a website that is easy to use and filled with information for Russian genealogy takes a lot of patience and time to uncover.

Погибшие is an incredible website with information spanning from War of 1812 to the first Chechen War. That makes it a unique website for Russian genealogy.

Usually, it would take a lot of time to cover this material on numerous websites that is just alone on Погибшие. This website provides information on some of those who served in the Patriotic War of 1812, Russian-Japanese War of 1904-1905, World War I, World War II, Afghanistan War and the first Chechen War.

Not only are patriotic Russians covered on this website, information can be found on some rebels and repressed people of the Russian Revolution and USSR.

This website is only in Russian and can be translated by using Google Translate. Here is the website translated into English.

Here are tips on how to use this website even with little knowledge of Russian.

  1. Have your surnames translated into Russian on Google Translate.
  2. Then copy and paste your translated surnames into the left box on Google Translate to see whether any of the names translate into words such as surname Kapusta (translated from Cyrillic to English will be Cabbage). When using Google Translate, someone looking for people named Kapusta will have to look for people named Cabbage.
  3. If using Google Translate makes this website too hard to understand, here is another way to search the entire website. Do step 1 and then paste one surname at a time next to site:http://xn--90adhkb6ag0f.xn--p1ai/ into Google.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Then copy and paste the search results into Google Translate to see which results are worth viewing.
  4. If this website doesn’t intimidate you in Russian, paste one surname at a time into the search box on the right above Введите фамилию солдата to find only soldiers.
  5. If you use Google Translate with this website, paste one surname at a time into the search box on the right above Enter the name of a soldier.
  6. Step 3 will be needed to search the entire website. It’s as simple as Иванов site:http://xn--90adhkb6ag0f.xn--p1ai/ into Google.
  7. Once you find information that could be useful, it’s time move onto serious searching on the Internet, based on the information you found.

Take that next step by reading Secrets of searching the Internet in Russian and Ukrainian like a native speaker.

A Russian genealogy gold mine awaiting to be cleared of its treasures

russianstatelibraryThe gold mines of Russian genealogy aren’t advertised. It takes a lot of sifting through boring technical databases to find the true gold mines of Russian genealogy.

After years of wondering where the Russian government has been unloading its electronic treasure trove, I think I have found a gem for genealogy. Thankfully, the database comes with the tools that help avoid sweating to find the treasures.

The Russian State Library is claiming to have the second largest online database. That’s hard to believe but the amount of records here are unreal.

Users can immediately begin searching with the help of Google Translate.

Here’s how to take full advantage of this user-friendly database even without knowing Russian.

  1. Copy and paste your keywords (surnames, villages, events, etc.) translated by Google Translate in the search box and click искать (find in English) on the right.
  2. When results come in, click on еще (more in English) at the end of each description.
  3. Copy and paste the results into Google Translate.
  4. Once you’ve selected which results are most interesting, right click on or copy and paste the link for прочитать документ (read document in English).
  5. Select Онлайн-просмотр (online viewing in English) on the top of the next page and then click открыть документ (open document in English).
  6. Then the document will open. Click on поиск (search in English) on the left.
  7. Copy and paste your keywords in Russian in the search box and click on найти (find in English).
  8. The exact pages where your keywords appear in the document will be listed under Найдено: (found in English).
  9. If you can’t find your information or read the text, right click to save the document. There are Facebook groups to help with translations. See Facebook Genealogy for links to those groups.

Once this is all done, the journey has only begun. Take the journey one step further by picking out keywords from the documents and using a Russian keyboard to retype important keywords.

Then copy and paste on Google the keywords from the documents to see what else can be found and who else is researching the same information.

Push yourself and you’ll go farther. Get annoyed that taking on Russian is challenging, you’ll be watching others take down their genealogy brick walls this year.