An overlooked record opens a door to finding long-lost family from WWII

My search to find relatives of my maternal great-grandfather has been a slow knockdown of a brickwall. Every few years, I feel as if I have chipped away at some cement holding up the brickwall but it’s still standing strong.

This time, I finally believe I will be chipping away enough cement to push out some bricks to find my family. I’ve attempted to find my family through letters, social networking sites and genealogy forum posts.

Nothing was working until I was bored after this holiday season. I started to get curious about my great-grandfather’s brothers’ service during World War II. At least, I could learn about their service during the war while I figured out a plan to find the family.

I was thrilled to learn on Подвиг Народа that the youngest brother of my great-grandfather received a 40th anniversary award for his participation in the war.

And thank goodness for Russia for posting the information online. I found a woman who lives near Central Archive of the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation on Всероссийское генеалогическое древо, the most popular Russian genealogy forum, to obtain the record for my curiosity.

The woman said the record wouldn’t offer much more information than what was already posted online, JUST his address from 1985,  military registration number and the enlistment office that gave the award.

An address from 1985 was enough to make me feel as if I got my chisel back on breaking down this brickwall. The researcher looked up the address on Yandex Maps (Russian version of Google Maps) and sent me links to photos of the address.

Another happy moment was to learn that it wasn’t an abandoned building. I still didn’t have the name of the person currently living at the home, thanks to an online address book for Kursk being removed a few years ago.

Whenever I’m stuck in getting information, I know posting on Всероссийское генеалогическое древо will get me some help. A man on the forum gave me the last name of the man living at the address of my great-grandfather’s brother and then I found the man’s initials for his first and middle names through some crafty searching on Yandex.

I tried to find the man who lives at the address on two Russian social networks (Odnoklassniki and VKontakte), but the name is too common.

Thanks to finding several relatives online in Russia, I sent the letter with an old family photo to a cousin in Saint Petersburg and he will send my letter to Kursk. The hope is that the man will be more eager to answer my letter when it was sent by another Russian.

I included in the letter my address on Odnoklassniki. Once he views my page on Odnoklassniki, I will know he received my letter. (Odnoklassniki reveals the identity of registered users who view members’ page.)

It’s been 74 years since my mother’s family has had contact with my great-grandfather’s family. Time will tell if an address of a baby brother from 1985 is all it takes to find this family and complete the story of how my family survived WWII.

Previous posts on this long search:
Putting some hope on military records to solve a family mystery
Getting some hope from the word “calculator”

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2 thoughts on “An overlooked record opens a door to finding long-lost family from WWII

  1. David

    Hi Vera:

    I’ve still had no reply from that place in the US. Do you have any other suggestions on how I can research the Petkevitch family?

    Thanks!!

    David

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