The gift of patience becomes a gift of knowledge five years later

I’m not one of the lucky people who can click and click on the popular genealogy websites to build my family tree and easily find distant cousins online.

Lately, it’s been feeling as if it has been easy to find those distant cousins if I forget about the number of years I’ve waited to make these connections.

A month ago, a woman from Far East Russia whose great-grandparents carried the same surname as my great-grandfather in the same village contacted me. I looked up her family on my list of 380 relatives on that line and couldn’t find her family.

Timing was everything in this situation. My researcher in Kursk was close to completing his study of records for another line in a nearby village. I immediately contacted him with the woman’s information on her great-grandparents to see whether he could find a connection.

About a month later, I had my answer. Yes, we are cousins. My 9th great-grandfather is her 8th great-grandfather. Apparently, I only can find cousins lately if it involves our ancestors knowing each other centuries ago.

I just had the big thrill of learning earlier this month a woman in Moscow is my 8th cousin, once removed. She gave me a massive tree in Russian that took several days to translate into English and add into my family tree.

Now, it was my turn to be the gift-bearing cousin. The woman in Far East Russia was thrilled to get a scan of her great-great-grandfather’s first marriage and birth records for two sisters of her great-grandfather.

Then, I added her family’s info to my tree to figure out her direct ancestors. She only had names of her great-grandparents a few days ago but now she has information for every generation, including siblings’ families, back to her 8th great-grandfather.

We would have never connected if it weren’t for Всероссийское генеалогическое древо, the most popular genealogy forum for the Russian-speaking world. So far, I have found cousins 5 times from my mother’s and father’s families on this website over the past 7 years.

Being patient after posting information on my ancestors has proven worth the wait.

Related posts:

Discovery of a small genealogy forum leads to pushing family tree back to the 1600s
Guide to Using the Best & Largest Russian Language Genealogy Forum (with a video guide linked)
New Russian cousins found again!

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An overlooked record opens a door to finding long-lost family from WWII

My search to find relatives of my maternal great-grandfather has been a slow knockdown of a brickwall. Every few years, I feel as if I have chipped away at some cement holding up the brickwall but it’s still standing strong.

This time, I finally believe I will be chipping away enough cement to push out some bricks to find my family. I’ve attempted to find my family through letters, social networking sites and genealogy forum posts.

Nothing was working until I was bored after this holiday season. I started to get curious about my great-grandfather’s brothers’ service during World War II. At least, I could learn about their service during the war while I figured out a plan to find the family.

I was thrilled to learn on Подвиг Народа that the youngest brother of my great-grandfather received a 40th anniversary award for his participation in the war.

And thank goodness for Russia for posting the information online. I found a woman who lives near Central Archive of the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation on Всероссийское генеалогическое древо, the most popular Russian genealogy forum, to obtain the record for my curiosity.

The woman said the record wouldn’t offer much more information than what was already posted online, JUST his address from 1985,  military registration number and the enlistment office that gave the award.

An address from 1985 was enough to make me feel as if I got my chisel back on breaking down this brickwall. The researcher looked up the address on Yandex Maps (Russian version of Google Maps) and sent me links to photos of the address.

Another happy moment was to learn that it wasn’t an abandoned building. I still didn’t have the name of the person currently living at the home, thanks to an online address book for Kursk being removed a few years ago.

Whenever I’m stuck in getting information, I know posting on Всероссийское генеалогическое древо will get me some help. A man on the forum gave me the last name of the man living at the address of my great-grandfather’s brother and then I found the man’s initials for his first and middle names through some crafty searching on Yandex.

I tried to find the man who lives at the address on two Russian social networks (Odnoklassniki and VKontakte), but the name is too common.

Thanks to finding several relatives online in Russia, I sent the letter with an old family photo to a cousin in Saint Petersburg and he will send my letter to Kursk. The hope is that the man will be more eager to answer my letter when it was sent by another Russian.

I included in the letter my address on Odnoklassniki. Once he views my page on Odnoklassniki, I will know he received my letter. (Odnoklassniki reveals the identity of registered users who view members’ page.)

It’s been 74 years since my mother’s family has had contact with my great-grandfather’s family. Time will tell if an address of a baby brother from 1985 is all it takes to find this family and complete the story of how my family survived WWII.

Previous posts on this long search:
Putting some hope on military records to solve a family mystery
Getting some hope from the word “calculator”

Discovery of a small genealogy forum leads to pushing family tree back to the 1600s

The best gifts really come in small packages. The discovery of a small forum that only spread over two pages can be credited to learning about my 3rd great-grandmother’s family back to the 1600s.

It’s pretty lucky to make this breakthrough. The forum was deleted a few months ago. Timing is everything, especially when things go poof on the Internet without warning.

Adding my 9th great-grandfather from this family onto my family tree was hardly a quick and easy process. I found the post by my 8th cousin, once removed, on our common surname from the same village on a Russian language genealogy forum in October 2012. Not a moment was spared to contact her.

It only was two weeks ago that I got the family tree that shows we are connected through my 7th great-grandfather, who was her 8th great-grandfather. This family line comes from her paternal grandmother and my 3rd great-grandmother. That’s what I call a distant cousin.

My cousin’s first e-mail message had the subject line- Здравствуйте двоюродный сестрa Кондрашeвa  (Hello cousin Kondrasheva) in October 2012. She was convinced we were related through an ancestor in the 1600s or 1700s. Her hunch was proven correct more than 4 years later.

I asked my researcher in Kursk to look at her family tree and see if he could connect our families three years ago. Nothing he found in old census records showed we were related. His research was looking at my direct ancestors, but not siblings and their families.

We stayed in contact on Facebook, with hope of figuring out this mystery. My cousin got busy with her own researcher to find as many documents as possible on her paternal grandmother’s family from Kursk Region archives and Russian State Archives of Ancient Acts.

It was only a few weeks ago that documents confirmed the relationship to my cousin in Moscow.  Her researcher’s thorough look at census records for siblings of my direct ancestors was the key to solving the mystery of our relationship.

I’ve lost count of the number of people my cousin’s researcher put in the family tree. It took several days for me to translate the names from Russian to English and add my distant cousins to my family tree.

I’m starting to lose count of the relatives I’ve found online. Only one Russian family found me on an English language website and everyone else found me on Russian language genealogy forums.

All thanks to using Google Translate and forcing myself to get comfortable with Russian language genealogy forums, I’ve connected with family throughout Russia and Ukraine. It’s amazing what can happen when your comfort zone is left behind.

Related posts:
Guide to Using the Best & Largest Russian Language Genealogy Forum
Making the right connections on forums